Below are descriptions of the workshops being offered:


Wednesday, May 2 (Day 1)

10:30-11:15 a.m.
Trauma 101 (four concurrent sessions): This session will cover the basics of trauma, including definitions and common terms, to help everyone start with the same understanding of trauma.

Rooms: Brunswick, Spotsylvania, York, Hanover


11:30-12:45 p.m.
Trauma-Informed Yoga (presented by Morgan Howell): A trauma-sensitive yoga class which will include information on how yoga can be helpful for trauma-survivors, brain games to build neuroplasticity, and self-regulation tools. The yoga postures and transitions will be basic. Some yoga mats will be available or feel free to bring your own. Anyone who would rather participate in a chair is welcome and encouraged to attend as well.

Room: Spotsylvania

Understanding and Supporting Human Trafficking Survivors (presented by Elena Brooks-Perkins and Katie Copty): In this workshop, presenters will provide an overview of human trafficking and the prevalence of this issue in the central Virginia region. Participants will learn the scope of this issue both worldwide and locally, how survivors are targeted, common vulnerabilities traffickers prey upon, red flags for trafficking, and how to identify and support survivors of human trafficking. Participants will engage in an activity that highlights the many ways a survivor can be recruited for trafficking and how difficult it can be to leave. Presenters will also dig deeper and discuss challenges that trafficking survivors often face, including addiction, trauma bonding, the physical and emotional impact of trauma, barriers to accessing help, and shame. Additional layers of challenges faced by underserved populations such as immigrant and LGBTQ+ survivors will also be addressed. Promising practices and new research in the field of treatment and intervention will be presented, as well as considerations for establishing rapport and building trust with survivors of trafficking. Participants will leave with a deeper understanding of the complexities of human trafficking and a new ‘toolbox’ that can be used when interacting with survivors in their work.

Room: Hanover

Trauma-Informed Support for the Survivor Turned Advocate: A Round-Table Discussion (presented by Joy Ingram): In this workshop/peer support session (for advocates who also identify as survivors), participants will discuss our simultaneous status as both survivor and advocate and how that position weighs on our well-being. Through discussing some of our experiences, we will address issues particular to the survivor-advocate. Some issues include being repeatedly triggered, working through triggers while dealing with clients, self-care immediately after experiencing a trigger, the effects of the work on our health, and regular self-evaluations of our overall health. Participants will leave with a better sense of community, and information on being a better advocate and a healthier survivor.

Room: King George

How Trauma Impacts Victims of Sexual Assault (presented by Nancy Oglesby and Mike Milnor): This workshop will help participants identify the parts of the brain and what each part is responsible for (memory storage, emotion regulation, decision-making), understand the science behind how trauma impacts the brain, specifically its impact on the pre-frontal cortex, the amygdala and hippocampus, and the “reptilian” brain. Participants will be able to recognize what “flash-bulb” memory and hyper-encoding looks like in a victim’s statement, and know what chemicals are released into the brain when trauma occurs that can lead to counter-intuitive behavior.

Room: Brunswick

Virginia Victim Fund (presented by Brienna Stammer)

Room: York


2:00-3:15 p.m.
Forced Marriage in the United States — Negotiating Safety Within a Client-Centered Framework (presented by Casey Carter Swegman and Anusce Sanai): Forced marriage is an emerging topic in the conversation about gender-based violence in the United States, and impacts women and girls from every walk of life. This session will provide an overview of the nature and scope of forced marriage in the U.S., the complex cultural and social dynamics which drive this form of abuse across diverse communities, and the innovative, long-term service model used to address the complex and layered needs of survivors through client-centered direct services and public policy advocacy to address systemic causes of increased vulnerability and limited access to services.

Room: Spotsylvania

Adverse Childhood Experience & Trauma-Informed Community Network (presented by Fred Orelove, PhD and Margo Buchanan, LCSW): This presentation examines the results of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study and their implications for children, families, and communities. Presenters will also offer an overview of Richmond’s Trauma-Informed Community Network (TICN) and the ways in which the network’s committees are working to solve challenges caused by childhood trauma in Central Virginia.

Room: Hanover

Addressing Sexual and Domestic Violence Using a Trauma-Informed Lens (presented by Karen Brown): During this presentation on domestic violence and sexual assault, the audience will receive an intimate look into the window of another’s life. They will witness the layers of an abused and traumatized little girl who one day realizes her purpose, while learning how to breathe, cope, and process it all. When we talk and tell our stories, we must know that the person you least expect is listening, learning, growing, and healing.

Room: King George

Trauma, Oppression, and Racial Justice (presented by Arianna Sessoms): This workshop focuses on the effects that trauma and oppression have on survivors of color. Inspired by the Action Alliance’s training on racial justice and survivor advocacy, this workshop consists of lecture-style teaching as well as an activity and small group discussion. Participants will be able to analyze and discuss how oppression not only negatively affects survivors but also decreases a person’s ability to build protective factors that would lessen their likelihood of perpetrating interpersonal violence. To end sexual and domestic violence we must work to end oppression of all kinds.

Room: Brunswick

The Art of the Difficult Conversation (presented by Dr. Michael Wriston): Being comfortable and effective in the ‘art’ of the ‘difficult conversation’ is a life-changing skill, as it enables people (young and old, men and women alike) to ‘take control’ of their lives and effectively resolve the myriad (personal and professional) issues that are an inevitable part of life. This workshop is designed to give participants ‘hands-on’ guidance with regard to how to both approach and structure the critical conversations that the vast majority of people tend to simply avoid and/or ‘over-react’ to.

Room: York


3:30-4:45 p.m.
Body Toxic: Tools and Strategies for Addressing Acute or Protracted Sexual Trauma (presented by Carolyn Stauffer): In this session participants will be introduced to the latest research and practice in sexual harms trauma and recovery. Beginning with an investigation of the physiology of sexual trauma, we will use ACE indicators to explore how toxic exposures influence neural development and social behavior. Next, participants will use the VIGOR risk management tool to analyze how survivors make decisions between competing protection strategies. This will be followed by an introduction to some metrics for gauging and developing trauma-sensitive personal and organizational environments. Lastly, we will use a compassion fatigue instrument to reflect on our own resilience and growth strategies as care givers.

Room: Spotsylvania

Trauma-Informed Care in Education (presented by Fred Orelove, PhD and Margo Buchanan, LCSW): Presenters explore the ways in which trauma exposure and adverse childhood experiences affect learning and behavior, particularly in educational settings. The session also presents trauma-informed strategies educators can use to teach and advocate for trauma-informed practices in schools.

Room: Hanover

What Happens When…Law Enforcement Officers Response to Inter-Personal Violence (presented by CT Moulton): Presenter will discuss the emerging trends regarding IPV response by LEO and the continued investigation. A case study will then be presented to show the results of a thorough investigation.

Room: King George

The Impact of Trauma on the Developing Brain (presented by Dr. Dawn O’Malley): This course is designed as an introduction to the core concepts of brain development. A primary focus is the impact of trauma, abuse, and neglect on the neurodevelopment of children ages 0 to 5 years, the period when the brain is developing most rapidly. The Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics TM will be introduced as a means of clinical problem solving for children who have experienced trauma during early childhood. Case conceptualization and treatment planning will be included.

Room: Brunswick

Trauma’s Impact and the Brain’s Resiliency (presented by Alice Twining): The why and how of trauma’s impact on the brain will be demonstrated with group participation. Trauma is often experienced as a global attack on brain functioning, and is likely to subject some survivors to what may be experienced as “their world has been turned upside down.” Other survivors may feel shattered by the trauma, like their brain has “gone to pieces.” The technique called narrative therapy will be explored in this context. The brain has the ability to reorganize and recover through the process of creating one’s own stories.

Room: York


Thursday, May 3 (Day 2)

11:30-12:45 p.m.
Panel Discussion with Lisette Johnson, KJ Delgado (Virginia Anti-Violence Project), Gaynell Sherrod (VCU), Rodney Loftin (Diversity Richmond), and Lt. Deuntay Diggs (Stafford County)

Room: Henrico Ballroom


2:00-3:15 p.m.
Contemplating Trauma-Informed Storytelling and Activism: “Baltimore Rising” Documentary Viewing and Discussion, PART I (presented by VCU School of Social Work Black Lives Matter Collective): This is the first of a two-part workshop session. Examining the intersections of personal experience, storytelling, and trauma-informed activism through the viewing and discussion of the film Baltimore Rising. We will prepare the audience for the film by introducing BLM Collective guidelines for discussion. Collective members will then facilitate a discussion on the film using a series of discussion questions to draw out different perspectives about the power of storytelling, its connection to different types of trauma-informed activism, and the role of self-care.

Room: Henrico Ballroom A

Continued Conversation with John Richardson-Lauve (presented by John Richardson-Lauve): In continuation of the keynote presentation, we will investigate the story of the individual and how it can be a powerful tool for strengthening the individual and overcoming past, current, and future trauma and adversity. How we write and tell our story makes all the difference. Brené Brown writes that we need to not be the villains of our own stories, and not even the heroes, but the authors. Through the lens of our own stories, we will explore ways to empower those around us and those with whom we work to own their stories and be empowered by them, rather than burdened by them.

Room: Henrico Ballroom B

Storytelling for the Movement — 11 Considerations for Telling Memorable, Meaningful, and Motivational Stories (presented by Joy Ingram): Participants in this workshop will examine ways to tell the most powerful stories for the desired effect. First we’ll identify different reasons for telling stories. Are we telling stories for healing, awareness, persuasion, or other reasons? Then, we’ll look at different elements to consider when telling effective stories. Some of those are audience, structure, theme, medium, and storyteller. Next we’ll look at a few stories and discuss them in relation to the information explored about effective storytelling. Finally, we’ll take a collection of data and create varying versions of the same story to illustrate how information can and should be presented in different ways for the biggest impact.

Room: Spotsylvania

Fatality Review (presented by Jane Tingley, Allison Clevenger, and Ryan Diduk-Smith): In this workshop attendees will gain a better understanding of the theory and process of fatality review and how Virginia’s fatality review teams function at the state, regional, and local levels. It will also highlight the valuable information these interdisciplinary teams collect during their in-depth case reviews and discuss ways attendees can incorporate the information into their work.

Room: Hanover

Whose Reality Counts? (presented by Raven Dickerson): Storytelling is an activity of oral history that produces change and preserves shared experiences. Participants will engage in activities that build beloved community which requires a shift of the perspective of domestic violence from advocate to storyteller. In the learning space participants collaborate to identify the critical components of their community/group story; gather the skills to create a safe environment for survivor story telling; and develop a “Storyboard” that assists them with continuing the work when they return to their community.

Room: Brunswick


3:30-4:45 p.m.
Contemplating Trauma-Informed Storytelling and Activism: “Baltimore Rising” Documentary Viewing and Discussion PART 2 (presented by the VCU School of Social Work Black Lives Matter Collective): This is the second of a two-part workshop session. Examining the intersections of personal experience, storytelling, and trauma-informed activism through the viewing and discussion of the film Baltimore Rising. We will prepare the audience for the film by introducing BLM Collective guidelines for discussion. Collective members will then facilitate a discussion on the film using a series of discussion questions to draw out different perspectives about the power of storytelling, its connection to different types of trauma-informed activism, and the role of self-care.

Room: Henrico Ballroom A

Sex Education and The Impact of Intersectionality: The Unheard Stories of Navigating a Sexually Confusing Culture (presented by Lisa Spidel, Destinee Wright, and Micah Jones): This workshop explores the realities of people who have previously been ignored during the conversation surrounding sex education in America. Through interactive exercises, personal narratives and discussions, participants will learn about the impact of our problematic sex education system, both as a source of misinformation and as a tool of racism, sexism, homophobia and transphobia. In addition, the workshop will address how these issues contribute to sexual assault and participants will learn techniques to promote healthy sexuality as a core component of primary prevention.

Room: Henrico Ballroom B

The Strength of Storytelling — Preparing for the Protective Order Process  (presented by Tonia Drewery and Stacey Sheppard): This workshop will utilize best practices for helping survivors navigate the protective order process. Topics include overview of protective order process, tips that help with EPO and PPO, areas in the state that have kiosks to do this, and more.

Room: Spotsylvania

Navigating the Landscape of Sexual Assault (presented by Nancy Oglesby and Mike Milnor): During this workshop, participants will discuss the current statistics of sexual assault and its far-reaching impact, and examine the statistics of false-reports and the myths that surround them. We will explore the concept of trauma-informed interviewing and the pieces necessary for a successful interview. Lastly, we’ll talk about the importance of empathy and the need to gain the trust of you victim in order to have the best interview.

Room: Hanover

#IfYouCouldSeeMe: Change Your Story, Change Your Life (presented by Erin Mahone): The most empowering thing a person can do is to reclaim the story of their life. We carry shame and fear that the world will discover the truth – we’ve experienced pain, we’ve made mistakes, we are faking it a lot of the time. The truth is that none of us are born with an instruction manual and NO ONE knows what they are doing. When we stand-up and tell our stories, we take back power over our lives and our narrative.

Room: Brunswick


Friday, May 4 (Day 3)

11:30-12:45 p.m.
Restorative Justice for Sexual Abuse: A Tool for Healing (presented by Brian S. Vaughan): Through an interactive and engaging session, participants will discuss the basics of Restorative Justice and its implications for law enforcement, judicial, and therapeutic systems. Specifically, we will be addressing the ways Restorative Justice can be used when someone has been impacted by sexual abuse.

Room: Henrico Ballroom A

A Candid Conversation — Strategies, Tips, and Tools for Being a Healthy Ally to Communities of Color (presented by Tiffany Turner-Allen)

Room: Henrico Ballroom B

Policing in the 21st Century (presented by Lt. Deuntay Diggs): This is a block of instruction which focuses on the challenges Law Enforcement Officers face in the performance of their duties.  During this block of instruction there will be discussion on how partnering with other agencies in local communities can strengthen trust and legitimacy for Law Enforcement Agencies.  There will also be discussion centered on what is community policing, and is it effective at deterring and reducing crime.

Room: Spotsylvania

Empathy-Based Interrogation (presented by Nancy Oglesby and Mike Milnor): This workshop will dive into the history of interrogation techniques in the United States and motivation behind the development of confrontational interrogation. We will discuss how using empathy can enhance a suspect’s willingness to talk in an interrogation and consider various interrogation models that are based on empathy – i.e. the PEACE model and HIG. Participants will learn about the benefits of using a soft interview room and look at the research behind current use of empathy-based interrogation.

Room: Hanover

Future Directions in Re-entry: A review of where we’ve been and where we are going (presented by DeVon Simmons and Dean Rolle): This workshop will take a look at the history of the development of comprehensive plans for the reintegration of previously incarcerated citizens in Virginia.  Including efforts to use evidence based programming and community outreach in our prisons and jails.   We will also review current efforts being made to ensure public safety and help lower our rates of recidivism.

Room: Brunswick

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